Four Guidelines for Financial Planning

By Matt DeBall

Financial planning is important, and it’s been great to talk about it this month. Marcia Shetler identified the new rules for financial planning for young adults in comparison to past generations. Jacqueline Painter of Everence highlighted the cost of making financial mistakes and led an awesome Live Chat about faith-based financial planning. Most recently, John Withum shared reorienting spiritual principles for financial planning.

As we conclude this month, here are four quick guidelines to help you with financial planning.

 Assess where your money is going

directory-235079_1280Do you have a budget? If not, consider forming one that reflects your goals and values. If you do have a budget, do your financial actions represent it well? Is there any way to modify your budget or spending habits to more closely put your faith, values, and goals into practice? Knowing how your money is used is a good first step in making changes and charting a course forward.

Ask a friend for help

It’s nice to be self-sufficient and learn new skills, but if you have a friend or family member who is well versed in handling their money, why not ask for help? There’s no reason to struggle on your own and you shouldn’t feel ashamed of asking for advice. (Note: rather than springing questions on your friend at a social gathering, ask if they would be willing to come over for dinner and talk about financial planning.)

Work with a professional

If you had a leaky pipe, you’d call a plumber. If you became very sick, you’d go to a doctor. These and other professionals have expertise and can help you more than you are able to help yourself. This includes financial advisors. If you’re in a difficult financial situation or anticipate one in the future, reach out to a financial professional and prevent current challenges from becoming worse.

Set one goal and stick to it

Financial planning can seem like a daunting task. Rather than trying to make many arrow-2886223_1280financial maneuvers all at once, set one attainable but challenging goal that will make a difference, and stick to it. Do you want to save more money? Consider where there is room in your budget to do so, and open a new checking or savings account to deposit that money after each paycheck. Improving your financial management one goal at a time is far better than becoming worn out or discouraged by trying to make many changes and not seeing much progress. Celebrate steps in the right direction and set new goals as old goals become habits.

About the Author

m-deball-9-2016Matt DeBall is the COMPASS Communications Coordinator for the Ecumenical Stewardship Center. He also serves as Coordinator of Donor Communications for the Church of the Brethren. He has an MDiv from Northern Seminary of Lombard, Illinois and a BA in Communication Arts from Judson University of Elgin, Illinois. He loves running, reading, and napping. He and Chelsea live in Northern Illinois with their Welsh Corgi, Watson, and attend the First Baptist Church of Aurora.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you’ve read? Visit the COMPASS web page, follow us on Twitter, and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Image credits: pixabay.com

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