Financial Tune-Up: a Personal Take on Saving

By Mitch Stutzman

Any conversation around money will inevitably include some talk about saving for the future. Whether that conversation is couched in terms of emergency savings, college savings, saving for a large purchase like a car or home, or retirement savings, the topic gets a lot of attention when a person considers their overall financial situation.

As I have thought about my own financial journey, and particularly about how saving has impacted my financial life, I have thought about times when my savings has become particularly meaningful. Times when my savings became more than just numbers floating in cyberspace that represent a determined value that our society has placed on them.

I found myself standing at the counter at my local auto repair shop. I had taken my vehicle in to be serviced and for a trained eye to give it a once-over and make sure everything was ready to go for a long trip that I was about to embark on. Things had been running well and I had no particular concerns but just wanted a seal of approval from someone smarter than me.

After my mechanic took a look at everything he told me that a there was some things he would recommend as a safety measure before taking this vehicle on a cross country trip. I trust my mechanic and believed that he had no intentions of selling me something I didn’t need. I said I would go ahead and have him do the work that was necessary. He informed me that with the additional work my bill was going to come to $1,200 for that particular visit. Well, I had not planned for this visit to the shop costing quite that much; but I wrote a check for the repairs. Ouch, that smarts.

After the work had been completed, I picked up my vehicle and was driving home with my wife. We were talking with each other about the unforeseen expense. I remember saying, “Well, writing that check wasn’t fun. But isn’t it great that we can write that check?”

I had read that week in an article from Forbes that 63% of Americans do not have enough savings to cover a $500 emergency. I told my wife that even though I didn’t welcome a $1,200 expense, I was so glad that we set aside emergency savings to cover it.

There was a time in my life when that would not have been the case; a time in my life when if faced with a $1,200 repair bill I may have been tempted to just call it a loss, leave the car at the shop, and walk home and let my mechanic deal with how to dispose of the vehicle. But over the past several years I have developed strategies for saving that work for me and (I can’t even believe what I am about to say) make me excited about saving!

Saving all starts with identifying your cash flow: What is coming in and what is going out. When what is going out exceeds what is coming in, the rest of your financial life doesn’t seem to fall into place like it should. In the words of my mechanic, “There’s your problem, right there.”

Establishing a healthy cash flow plan is the first step in building your savings. I want to take a moment to simply recognize that a person’s expenses exceeding their income can be the result of many different factors. I also want to own and recognize that I have found myself in places of privilege throughout my life which has afforded me opportunities not available to some. But, regardless of status, the principle remains the same that to save you need to make sure expenses do not exceed your income.

Some expenses are unavoidable. Things like food, clothes, and shelter are basic needs that typically require some level of financial commitment.  However, when you step back and take a hard look at your spending, you may be surprised to find that there are some things that could be cut from your everyday spending. I heard it said once that people rarely get themselves into debt or money trouble from one $10,000 purchase, but rather one thousand $10 purchases.

The discipline to make more intentional choices takes practice. It is truly amazing how much money you can save by just waiting one more day to make your decision instead of making your purchase right away.  Instead of buying that cute novelty coffee mug that you saw online, wait one day and see if your life is empty without it. I would venture to guess that many of our “impulse buys” are things that we can probably do without.

So, give yourself a financial tune up and consider what it is that brings you satisfaction. In my experience, peace of mind provides a level of satisfaction that stuff doesn’t. The knowledge that if an unexpected expense reveals itself I can cover it helps me sleep better at night. Take a hard look at your spending and saving habits and make the changes you must to position yourself in way that you can live comfortably and give generously to the causes and organizations you love most.

About the Author

Mitch Stutzman is a Stewardship Consultant for Everence.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS Initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS blog, follow us on Twitter, and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

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