How to Give More During Lent (and Beyond) – Part 2

By Matt DeBall

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We began this month with an introduction post by Marcia Shelter that invited us to 
consider how we can “give more” during Lent—taking a step beyond the traditional trend of “giving something up” for Lent. Two weeks ago, I invited you to do a self-inventory of your time, possessions, and budget to consider what you can put aside or change for Lent that could allow for the capacity to give more. Last week, Timothy Siburg shared a great reflection about how he has taken on something new for Lent this year. This week we will explore how to take practical steps to move forward and give more during Lent.

Taking a path of simplicity and generosity, especially in our world today, is not always an easy task. With many demands (some very important, some not so much) on our time, energy, and resources, it’s easy to get caught up in the ebb and flow of a busy life and miss the opportunity to live in a way that best honors God and shows love to those around us. The season of Lent invites us to intentionally consider all that is happening in our lives and to put some things aside to more fully focus on the work of Jesus through his death and resurrection as well as the work that God continues to do in us and in the world.

A helpful first step toward living a more generous life is considering how you spend or share your time, energy, possessions, and money. For help to do this, feel free to check out the first part of this post. After doing a careful assessment of these aspects of our lives, we can then move forward and make changes to be more generous. Here are a few thoughts to help you consider how to give more:

1) Give more time – Is there a member of your family, faith community, or neighborhood who is in a rough season? Is there a way that you could offer help or simply a listening ear to show God’s love to them? Is there a local charity or community group that does great work and whom could benefit from your service? Is there an initiative at box-18749_1280your church that you are passionate about but have not yet given a try? All of these are questions that can help you share more of your time.

2) Give more money – Have you noticed any purchases like drive-thru coffee, eating out that you could replace with cheaper alternatives for Lent (or longer)? Do you have a phone plan or TV package that is more complex (and expensive) than you need? These cost savings may not amount to significant savings, but every bit we can decrease in our regular expenses allows us the flexibility and peace of mind to be more generous. In cutting down non-essential costs, what ministry of your church or initiative in your community could benefit from your support?

3) Give away or share more possessions – Now is the perfect time for spring cleaning.
Are there any items which you rarely or never use (clothes, tools, non-perishable foods, books, or other lightly worn objects) which you could give to someone in need or share with a local charity? You may also want to consider selling nicer clothes to a second-hand store and donating the money you receive to an organization in your community. Does gratitude-1201945_1280someone
in your neighborhood attend the same church or community events as you? And could carpooling be
a valuable option for both of you? Considering these
ideas may help you become a better steward of what
God has given you.

4) BONUS – Give more of yourself – After minimizing non-essential drains on our time, energy, and money, we not only have more of these items to give, but in general, we have more of ourselves to give. When our schedules
are less full with non-essential fillers, our living spaces
are less cluttered, and our minds are less busy, we can be more fully present in our times of rest (whether alone or with family) as well as in moments of sharing and serving others.

Though making changes can be difficult, it’s remarkable how small adjustments can make a big difference. As you consider how God may be leading you to be more generous, we hope you will feel renewed in this Lenten season and beyond.

About the Author

m-deball-9-2016Matt DeBall is the COMPASS Communications Coordinator for the Ecumenical Stewardship Center. He also serves as Coordinator of Donor Communications for the Church of the Brethren. He has an MDiv from Northern Seminary of Lombard, Illinois and a BA in Communication Arts from Judson University of Elgin, Illinois. He loves running, reading, and napping. He and Chelsea live in Northern Illinois with their Welsh Corgi, Watson, and attend the First Baptist Church of Aurora.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you’ve read? Visit the COMPASS web page, follow us on Twitter, and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Image credits: pixabay.com

Keeping Your College Years Affordable- At Least 7 Ideas (PART 1)

By Timothy Siburg

We all know that going to college or graduate school can be expensive. Marcia and Ryan covered that well earlier this month, in fact. I am happy to say that there are ways to keep your college years affordable that worked for me and might work for you.

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“The Great Wall of Cup of Noodles” beginning to form in the spring of my first year in college. By the end of the semester, the entire left hand side of the window would be full of the Cup of Noodles from top to bottom.

During my first year of college, my roommate found a way to save on some food costs by stocking up on cup of noodles soups. He loved them so much, as the year went on, he even built a wall of cup of noodles to help block out the sun near his desk. This was humorous to me for several reasons, but especially because our room’s window was shaded well by a big tree outside it, and given that we were at a college in western Washington state, overly sunny non-cloudy days were not common experiences.

I must confess that I got through college affordably thanks to great scholarship support, and my parents’ help paying for school. I am grateful for that, and in the years since college, have worked to give back financially (and in other ways) as possible to help other students afford the great education that I believe I received. I view that as part of my faithful response, and a way to steward what I have been entrusted with by God.

Even with the great scholarships I received, I discovered at least seven helpful ways to make college even more affordable.

Walking

In college and especially grad school, I put an emphasis on walking. Instead of driving to the palley-1840264_1280harmacy or grocery store a half mile off campus, if it wasn’t raining I loved to walk. This obviously helps save a little on the car costs, but it is also good exercise, good physical stewardship. In grad school, I didn’t have much of a choice, as I went carless in Claremont, California. Thus, I walked to Trader Joe’s a few blocks away for groceries, and even to church, 1.8 miles each way. Of course, you can’t beat Southern California weather, so that was enjoyable. When needing bigger things, like a Costco run, it helped to have friends with cars though.

Friends, Family, and Parents

Speaking of friends, it certainly helps to have friends, family, and especially parents who visit or are nearby. For me, this meant a free place to do laundry whether at my parents’ or grandma’s home while in college. It also meant, good home cooking, which you start to miss while at college. It’s never a bad thing either to have your loved ones come and treat you for a lovely lunch or dinner off campus too. I am grateful I had all of this (and so much more support) when I was in school.

Textbooks

One of the most expensive parts of college can books-1943625_1280be textbooks. In some fields, new editions are printed seemingly every year, and because of that, prices can seem astronomical. Often, you can get by with a slightly older edition, saving you some money. In other cases, using a website like half.com, or a used book site can be helpful. Better yet, if you have friends who have recently taken the class requiring your book(s), perhaps you can borrow it from them, or even trade textbooks as needed? In seminary, when my wife and I found ourselves in the same class, we tried often to only purchase one copy of the required books to share. This worked some times, but we also like to take notes in our books, so other times, we had to breakdown and purchase a copy for each of us.

Here are a few ideas to keep your college years affordable. Come back next week for more.

About the Author

timothy headshotTimothy Siburg is the Director for Stewardship of the Nebraska Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), a Deacon in the ELCA, and is a member of the COMPASS Steering Committee. His wife Allison serves as an ELCA pastor, and together with their cat Buddy, they reside in the greater Omaha area. Timothy attended college at Pacific Lutheran University, and graduate school at the Claremont Graduate University and Luther Seminary. Timothy can also be found on TwitterFacebook, and on his blog.

Image credits: Timothy Siburg, pixabay.com

Returning to “Why,” in Hopes of Getting Off the Consumer Escalator

By Timothy Siburgwhy-1432955_1280-red

Over the past three weeks we have pondered about the ups, downs, and challenges of riding and being on the consumer escalator. We have recounted many reasons why we might want to rethink our spending and the way we steward our time and resources around Christmas and Thanksgiving. In the previous November posts, Marcia, Matt, and John have done a beautiful job of offering alternatives and insight into positive ways to reconsider consumerism.

This week, I want us to dig into the question of “why?” What really matters this time of the year, and how might focusing on that question make for a more faithful response and richer holiday experience?

For a Christian, the why can be found in the heart of the Christmas gospel in Luke 2:1-20, often read every Christmas Eve. Within that rich text, we hear the proclamation from the angel of the Lord,

 nativity-scene-1807602_1280-crop“Do not be afraid, for see- I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David, a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord.”
– Luke 2:10-11, NRSV

 It might sound trite to say that this is the “reason for the season.” And I am not exactly trying to say that. But if we remember that this is at the heart of the celebrations, festivities, food, fellowship, and all of the gift giving this time of year; if we remember that it is the fulfillment of the promises of the prophets which guide our journey through the season of Advent to the manger; we might just have a chance to get off the consumer escalator.

I am one who loves to give gifts. My wife Allison and I see that as one of our love languages. We also love to say thank you, which is why Thanksgiving is one of our favorite holidays. But at the heart of our gift giving, joy, and gratitude, is a knowledge that we give gifts because it is one of our joyful responses to the pure gifts and good news of God who we know through Christ Jesus.

We don’t give gifts because we want to earn something in return. We give without the expectation of return. We give, because we can’t help but feel so overjoyed with the good news of a God who comes near, becomes incarnate, walks with us, is given for us, and loves us. In our joy, we can’t help but want to share our joy through the sharing of our stories, time, the giving of gifts, living fully in God’s abundance and love.

envelop-576252_1280 Of course, Allison and I don’t give without a plan. We always sit down and make our Christmas budget each year prior to Thanksgiving. We include plans for our annual Christmas letter and the costs associated with printing and mailing it, as well as our hopes for what we are willing to give to family and friends, our congregation, and other needs, nonprofits, and ministries we feel connected to and passionate about.

So, why do you give? Why do you do what you do this time of year- spending, wrapping, cooking, eating, decorating, gathering with friends, families, and colleagues? What part of the promises of God and the Christmas story motivate you and lead you into the way that you spend your days and evenings this time of year?

However you may answer these questions, I hope and pray that you have a meaningful journey to the manger, and are so caught up in the promises of the good news, that you can’t help but want to share it. And for those of you who feel like you are stuck on the consumer escalator, I hope that by thinking deeply about the “why,” you might feel comfortable and confident in your ability to get off it.

About the Author

timothy headshotTimothy Siburg is the Director for Stewardship of the Nebraska Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), a Deacon in the ELCA, and is a member of the COMPASS Steering Committee. His wife Allison serves as an ELCA pastor, and together with their cat Buddy, they reside in the greater Omaha area. Timothy can also be found on Twitter, Facebook, and on his blog.

Image credits: pixabay.com

Reconsidering consumerism

By John Withum

It was Christmas Eve 2014, and I was in panic mode.

vrcvr4qdFor a few years, my wife and I set Christmas budgets on what we could spend for each other. We left a little wiggle room, but always tried to stick to it. I had spent my budget, but the pile of presents under the tree seemed unimpressive. She was having a rough year at work, and I felt guilty that I had not put more effort into selecting her gifts. And that explains how I ended up spending almost $100 on last minute gifts at Target.

What in the world caused me to attempt to satisfy an emotional response with inanimate objects? Searching for the answer led me to re-examine the messages consumer capitalism has sold me about my self-worth, particularly around the winter seasonal celebrations.

Beginning almost immediately after the front doors have closed on the last trick-or-treaters, retailers roll out deals and decorations for the variety of celebrations between November 1 and December 26. Interestingly, very few of these sales focus on Thanksgiving, and most of them skip straight to the end of December. Why? No one gives Thanksgiving presents.

Consumer capitalism, at least the variety found in the United States, utilises every opportunity it can to earn money on the emotional response to various holidays and special days in cultures. As winter celebrations have continued to evolve in the U.S., consumer capitalism has ensured it has a hand in shaping public formation around two traditions: traditional winter cultural celebrations and the actual Christian holiday of Christmas.

Where did most of what we know as the “holiday season” in the United States originate? The long, dark winters of northern Europe is as good of a place as any to start. Think yule santa-claus-1628845_1280logs, wassail, the various iterations of “Santa Claus” (such as Sinterklaas from the Netherlands, Father Christmas from England, Kris Kringle from Germany), trees, and stockings. There are many, many more to be mentioned, but hopefully this is enough to make the point. It is easy for capitalism to co-opt these winter celebrations because, being cultural, they have developed over long periods of time. They can be further exploited by retail marketing, advertising executives, and businesses who are interested in cashing in on good feelings. Most of these traditions being exploited are from northern Europe, where the lack of daylight in winter months has encouraged celebrations revolving around community, light, warmth, and rebellion against the darkness.

What is surprising is how easily marketers have drawn in classic Christian celebrations of Christmas. The whole message of Christmas, in the words of Christian author Scot christmas-1010749_1280McKnight, is “about a God who entered into the world in a socially shamed family in order to lift the socially shamed to the highest name ever.” It is about Israel’s true king being born into a feed trough while the false king of Israel murdered children. Christmas, situated at the end of Advent, must deal with looking back on the moment when our help in this world arrived and looking forward to the day when justice and righteousness reigns in fullness through Jesus’ return to Earth.

There is a long history—dating back to the late 300s—of Christmas being used to lure followers of Jesus away from the sort of northern European pagan celebrations mentioned earlier. It seems, sadly, that Christmas has a bad reputation for being compromised. For whatever reasons, Christians have constantly been willing to trade the deep, world-shaking message of Christ’s arrival for a more comfortable place in society. It is not insignificant to consider the trade-off of message for comfort began after Constantine imposed the will of the Roman empire on the church by declaring Christianity the official religion in 317 C.E.

And here we are today. We are still trading comfort for our witness in the world. We would still rather tell our children about Santa Claus than have them be outcasts. We continue to drain our wallets and pile up debt in the name of hoping our loved ones feel our love in the weight of the possessions in their hands. We want to go with the flow of society, except on Sunday when it’s time to proclaim and sing the Scriptures of old about the arrival of our Saviour. Jesus Christ, Son of God, forgive us.

fireplace-croppedConsumer capitalism helps all of us to feel better about all of this by appealing to the same sensitivities that gave birth to the aforementioned winter traditions. The sunlight grows short, the darkness grows long, the cold creeps in—so bring us light displays and fireplaces. The change in the season often brings loneliness—so tell us it is time for families and parties at your local chain restaurant. We become thankful for all the people who help us get through the tough seasons of life—so thank them with lots of gifts, purchased online or at your local retailer.

But what if we flipped the script on consumer capitalism and collusion with old pagan traditions? When we realise God is not far from us (Acts 17), we see there could be one thing the winter celebrations have to offer: the focus on light.

Read John 1. Read Isaiah 9. The arrival of Jesus Christ is a light in the darkness. These old winter celebrations are awake to a reality that darkness is difficult to live with, and light is necessary for survival; what they miss is how the light truly arrives and is manifested. God sent his light in the world to illuminate the darkness, and has called followers of Jesus out of the darkness to be witnesses to this light.

When we are confronting the darkness as followers of Jesus the Light, we must be careful not to fall prey to the traditional consumer capitalistic agendas for our world. Splashing the cash on a bunch of gifts is not going to bear witness to the Good News of God being born to rescue the world. There must be a difference between the way we behave towards Christmas—a Christian holy day—and whatever this watered down, consumer capital nonsense is. It begins by asking ourselves what is actually redemptive, especially in the face of what the rest of culture tells us.

Most of us, at this time of year, have calendars full of events and activities. What if we reconsidered which of those were actually important? Colossians 4:5 (NLT) tells us to “Live wisely among those who are not believers, and make the most of every opportunity.” Carefully consider what is occupying so much of your precious time. Which social events will be enhanced by your presence and allow you to spread the light? Which events are merely obligations and only require you to “make an appearance”? Your presence and absence is a message to others, and we are poor stewards of our time if we say yes to every gathering.

If our time matters, then it makes little sense to spend our time in stores (or online shopping!) when that time could be used to remind your starbanner-boxloved ones, children, etc. that they are actually a priority in your life. Use the opportunity to rest and recharge (which is absolutely a biblical response to free time) or to find a way to increase the light of Jesus in your neighbourhood, community, or family. Again, if how we spend our time makes a statement, it will make a statement to our families if we are spending time with them rather than being elsewhere.

What about the thorny business of gift-giving? We can fairly thoroughly dismantle lots of the persuasions of consumer capitalism, but since childhood, we have been taught to expect we will give and receive gifts at this time of the year. Our desire to please our loved ones is not intrinsically bad; our desire to quantify our love with possessions is. We have a choice of whether to buy presents for a few people who we truly love and care about, or a lot of people we feel obligated to give a gift to. When we pare down the list, we can reduce the time and potential financial damage due to guilt, and we can increase how much the gift means to us. My uncle regularly travels throughout the country, and takes beautiful pictures everywhere he goes. One year for Christmas, he combined some of his photographs with my mother’s favourite hymn out of an ornate older hymnal and presented it to her in a beautiful frame. It was very thoughtful, and it hangs on her wall to this day.

This is also an excellent time to teach our children new expectations when it comes to gifts. I grew up making lists of desired toys from adverts in the newspaper, then eagerly storming the living room on Christmas morning to see the piles of presents I expected. No matter what the haul was, I always felt empty by Christmas evening. The presents were opened, the meals were eaten, and there was no longer anything to look forward to. If we teach our children early about the good news of Christmas, and tell them in their terms about our priorities for Christmas, we create an opportunity to form their lives around the Gospel rather than consumer capitalistic desires. Consider the “Want, Need, Wear, Read” approach. It involves buying one thing your child wants, one thing she is in need of, one thing to wear, and a new book to read. This allows children to see gifts as purposeful, meaningful, and that there is more to Christmas than wrapping paper.

Reconsidering our behaviour towards Christmas is not nearly as tidy as tweaking a few shopping habits or taking back our calendars. These long-held consumeristic patterns are tied up with our emotions and, often times, can mingle with our fears of hurting someone’s feelings or disappointing our children if we change these ways. To be sure, toes will be stepped on and boundaries must be created and enforced.northern-lights-984120_1280

Since the fateful trip to Target two years ago, my wife and I have slowly taken back Christmas’s meaning in our lives. We started a Christmas morning pancake breakfast and service at our church for anyone who needs a warm, bright, inviting place to be. We have tamed the number of people we buy gifts for, and focus on gifts that involve spending time with the ones we love. And this year, rather than giving each other gifts, we are scratching an item off our bucket list and going to Minnesota to see the northern lights.

Reclaiming Christmas is hardly easy, but it is worth it.

About the author

Processed with VSCOcam with kk1 presetJohn Withum is the associate pastor of the First Baptist Church of Aurora, Illinois. He also serves as the recess supervisor at a local elementary school. He has an MDiv from Northern Seminary of Lombard, Illinois and a BA in Journalism from Marshall University of Huntington, West Virginia. He and his wife, Katie, live in Northern Illinois with their dog, Bacon.

Image credits: pixabay.com

Seven Suggestions for Gift Giving

By Matt DeBall

“Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver” (2 Corinthians 9:7).

Gift giving is a hallmark of the holidays. God set the tone for this when Jesus was given to us as the savior of the world. Remembering God’s gift of love, we gather with family and friends for festivities and exchange gifts to express love to one another.

icmeelgsThough it goes without saying, loving one another, through spending time together and giving gifts to one another, is an important endeavor. However, with the distraction of flashy advertisements, we sometimes buy and give unsustainably. We might recognize our financial limitations, but feel pressured to spend beyond our means, and as a result, buy gifts with hesitation. We may also get carried away with holiday sales and buy gifts without much forethought. Whether we are more prone to reluctance or compulsion, neither motive matches the joy we should experience in giving. As you prepare for this holiday season, consider these seven practical suggestions for gift giving.

#1 Budget – Carefully plan how much you can spend on party preparations and gifts for family and friends, and take steps to stick to your budget. Be sure to include even small expenses as they can add up quickly. (Wish you could give more? Consider how you could better prioritize gift giving in your budget for next year.)

#2 Buy with cash – Purchasing gifts with cash will support your plans to spend within your budget, and by not using credit cards, you can also avoid added stress when you see your next statement (livingonthecheap.com/35-tips-to-save-money-and-time-during-the-holidays).

#3 Try a “secret Santa” or “white elephant” gift exchange white-304608_1280Especially for large families, these two methods of exchanging gifts can allow for cheerful, budget-friendly giving. “Secret Santa” allows for every person to give and receive a thoughtful gift, and “white elephant” can make for a fun-filled gift experience (www.wikihow.com/Organize-a-White-Elephant-Gift-Exchange).

#4 Create a thoughtful card – This is the perfect combination of a handwritten note and a decorative, one-of-a-kind card. Craft a card that will be appreciated by the recipient and write a heart-felt message inside. You may consider including a photo and a poem or brief story from an important shared memory from the last year (www.biblemoneymatters.com/100-frugal-creative-homemade-christmas-gifts).
Additional option: include a $10 gift card.

#5 Call for a potluck – This is another idea that can be helpful for large families. Invite everyone to bring their favorite dish or two to share for dinner. This both allows everyone to contribute to the meal and prevents one person from fitting the entire bill alone. Tip: Invite everyone to say what they are bringing in advance to better plan for a diverse spread of food.

#6 Make homemade gifts – Whether for cookie-1786885_1280stocking stuffers or regular gifts, consider what gifts you could make for your loved ones. Candies, cookies, candles, and crocheted (drink) coasters are a few creative and simple ideas. You could also give homemade coupons for a coffee or ice cream outing so you can spend time together. One other option: a cookie exchange could be used to supplement
or compliment an exchange of
traditional gifts.

#7 Remember what is most important – While everyone enjoys giving and receiving gifts, remember that the reason for gathering is to celebrate the birth of Jesus and to spend time together. Don’t forget the intangible opportunities of the season like singing Christmas carols, sharing family stories, and simply being together.

By considering these seven suggestions, you and your family can prepare for a pleasant gift giving experience and, overall, enjoy happier holidays.

Do you have any suggestions for saving money on holiday gifts? Share them below.

About the author

m-deball-9-2016Matt DeBall is the COMPASS Communications Coordinator for the Ecumenical Stewardship Center. He also serves as Coordinator of Donor Communications for the Church of the Brethren. He has an MDiv from Northern Seminary of Lombard, Illinois and a BA in Communication Arts from Judson University of Elgin, Illinois. He loves running, reading, and napping. He and his wife, Chelsea, live in Northern Illinois with their Welsh Corgi, Watson, and attend the First Baptist Church of Aurora.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page, follow us on Twitter, and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Enough: a faith connection

By Dori Zerbe Cornelsen

“So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today” (Matthew 6:34, ESV).treasure-chest-619762_1920

Jesus talks about the intimacy our hearts have with our treasure before he gets to reminding us not to worry. He encourages us not to store up stuff that that breaks, rusts, wears out and can be stolen. In other words, any stuff stored up is what captures our hearts and becomes what we love. It can take us away from what God intended in the good creation as abundance for all. Rather it becomes scarcity for ourselves.

How do we go from our hearts getting caught up with stuff and move toward the relational possibilities of abundance for all? Maybe it’s possible to journey into such an adventure of discovering enough with our friends, life partners, small group at church or dorm floor.when-you-have-less-stuff-j-becker

I keep going back to an inspirational story about finding enough in the book, Basic Trek: Venture Into a World of Enough: The Original 28-day Journey, edited by Dave Schrock-Shenk, Mennonite Central Committee. In this book Deborah Fast shares a story (Day 16):

Preparing for a three-year term of service in Kenya, my husband and I spent hours carefully packing. “If in doubt, leave it out,” was our motto, as we proudly fit everything into three boxes, two backpacks and various carry-ons. Almost three years later in Kenya, we helped a young Maasai man prepare for a year in Canada as an exchange visitor. We explained Canadian customs, food and weather. We also met at the airport to send him off.

We found Julius near the check-in counter. “Where is your luggage?” I asked. “Here,” he said gesturing to the small bag he carried. “That’s it?!” I exclaimed. “It’s not even full!” “It’s enough,” he said. But Julius also brought two vans, rented for the occasion, packed full of Maasai friends and relatives coming to say good-bye. Dressed in brightly colored traditional garb, they surrounded him with concern and goodwill.

This deeply moving experience has stayed with me. A young Kenyan man, carrying fewer possessions than I would consider “enough” for a weekend trip, heading off for a year in a distant, unfamiliar country. What Julius did carry with him was far more significant – the love, support and sense of identity embodied in the bright red, yellow and blue-clad throng of chanting, singing, and waving fellow Maasai.

Jesus knew that we would discover enough not by ourselves but in the company of others. The good news to which Jesus invites us is to imagine together what new and joyful options there are for living in the reality of God’s abundance. And as Jesus promises, when we put our efforts there “all these things will be given to you as well.”

About the Author:
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Dori Zerbe Cornelsen is a Gift Planning Consultant with Abundance Canada, encouraging and inviting generous living.  She and her husband Rick live in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where lots of generous, warm people live in cold temperatures for 6 months of the year.

We Are What We Eat – Part 2

During April, the COMPASS blog is sharing perspectives about environmental stewardship and being eco-friendly on a budget. Today we welcome back regular contributor Dori Zerbe Cornelsen who reflects about how “We are what we eat.”

It is early spring where I live on the Canadian prairies.  There are just a few crocuses blooming in my otherwise still barren garden.  It’s the time of year when I begin to yearn for colour after a long white winter.

Produce from Metanoia Farmers

Produce from Metanoia Farmers

I also yearn for fresh food greens and veggies, grown locally.  One of the ways we have decided to enjoy fresh local produce in the summer is by participating in a Community Shared Agriculture project called Metanoia Farmers Worker Cooperative.  We buy a half share for the two of us and get to eat whatever the land is producing that week, by the work of hands of farmers we know, from sometime in June into September.

I like that faith is part of the Metanoia Farmers’ motivation.  Here is a description:

“The Metanoia Farmers Worker Cooperative is a group of CMU (Canadian Mennonite University) students and alumni, emerging as farmers motivated by our faith, who use sustainable practices to provide food to urban eaters.  We grow a wide variety of only heirloom vegetables and are developing our seed saving skills to continue to be able to grow these vegetables…The Metanoia Farmers operate as a workers cooperative, practicing consensus decision-making models.  We hope to foster meaningful dialogue while joyfully stewarding God’s gift of the land.”

dori-zerbe-cornelson-220x220I can almost taste the kale now…

About the AuthorDori Zerbe Cornelsen works with Mennonite Foundation of Canada encouraging and inviting generous living.  She and her husband Rick live in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Image Credit: Produce from Metanoia Farmers

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.