Eco-Friendly on a Budget

As the calendar turns to April, our focus turns to environmental stewardship. Later this month, on Friday April 22nd, the World will observe Earth Day 2016. In observance, the COMPASS blog will feature perspectives all about being environmentally friendly on a budget and our stewardship of the Earth.

eco friendlyThe first post in this series will take up the idea that “We Are What We Eat.” In addition to this, other reflections will include thoughts pertaining to: the stewardship of recycling; sustainability; community agriculture; the work of restoring creation; as well as water stewardship. If you would like to share a post or reflection within this theme, please let me know as we are always looking for more perspectives to share as part of COMPASS and our shared conversation about faith and finances.

To begin our conversation, consider these questions:

  • Do you think about where the food you eat comes from?
  • Do you actively recycle in your home and office?
  • Do you produce more things that go into recycling each week, or the garbage?
  • Do you leave lights on in rooms that you are not seated in? How about water running while you are brushing your teeth?
  • How might the answers to these questions be informed by your faith?

A Personal Confession

In asking these questions, I have to confess that I often come up a bit short. I don’t always eat the healthiest diet, nor always look for the most sustainable source of food. I do occasionally leave lights on in rooms that I am not in, and from time to time catch myself leaving the water running while no longer actively using the faucet. Even with the ability to recycle, I still think my wife Allison and I produce more garbage than recycling.

I work hard to recycle both at home and in the office, and this is made easier by living in neighborhoods and cities where recycling is a priority. However, I have come to learn through traveling, that this is not always the case across the country and world in all communities.

The way we care for our environment matters to me, because I believe that we are called to be stewards of creation. In Genesis we are reminded that God has created all, and invites us to participate with God in caring for it and working with it. When we lose sight of this, when we don’t show care for it, we are all impacted. Not only does it negatively impact the quality of our planet, it shows disrespect for the beauty that God has created for us to live and work in.

Environmental Stewardship on a Budget

How we live faithfully in this way on a budget sometimes may mean a bit more of a cost. Choosing to eat healthier may not always be the cheaper option. Recycling may not always be more budget friendly than garbage. But at least, utility costs are usually positively impacted when you turn the lights off as well as the faucet off. And, if you don’t mind it in the summer, you can turn the temperature up on your thermostat to save energy during the day, as well as down a bit during the winter to cut down on heating costs.

As we take up these questions this month, I invite you to share your perspective, and I look forward to the conversation together.

timothy headshotAbout the Author: Timothy Siburg is the Communications Associate for the Ecumenical Stewardship Center and focuses especially on the center’s COMPASS initiative focused on creating conversations and resources for faith and finances among younger Adults and Millennials. Timothy also currently serves as a congregational mission developer, among a few other roles and blogs regularly on his own blog as well.

Image Credit: Eco Friendly

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Talking about Faith and Finances- Purchasing a New Home

During September, the COMPASS blog is digging deeper into the topic of conversations about money by sharing different perspectives, questions, and approaches. As we continue the series today, I am excited to welcome my friends Pastors Amanda and Jeremy Ullrich to the blog. They have very recently purchased their first home which led me to want to hear their story. Today’s post is the second in a two-part series which focuses on their recent experience of buying a new home. 

Timothy (T): Amanda and Jeremy, why were you looking for a new home?

Amanda and Jeremy with their Realtor outside of their new home

Amanda and Jeremy with their Realtor outside of their new home

Jeremy (J): Well, we have been renting a house since we arrived in West Texas a little over a year ago when Amanda and I moved here to start our first calls as pastors. We wanted to make the investment in a new home for a number of reasons, including potentially expanding our family.

T: What did you learn when running the numbers and doing your research?

J: When running the numbers, we realized that the cost of renting for two years was basically the same as buying a new house and making a monthly mortgage payment for two years, and then selling it after two years.

Amanda (A): We also realized that we could save over $400 per month by buying a home rather than renting, including the cost for utilities and the mortgage. We live in a relatively inexpensive housing market with lots of good options, which made searching for our first home fun and full of possibilities.

J: We determined that after three years of buying our first house, we would save about $10,000 that first year, and then nearly $30,000 after the fourth year. The long term potential savings for us was a big reason to decide to buy a new home.

T: Were there any other factors in your decision to buy a home, rather than rent?

A: There is another element in our decision. In ministry, pastors often move at least a few times in their careers, and of course we have no idea how long we’ll be here until we might feel a call by God to some other context. We feel though that by buying a home, rather than renting, we are demonstrating to our congregations and the community that we are investing in the area for the longer term.

J: As we discussed, planning for the future is important for us. We’re still learning, and have not always been the best at financial planning, but we are working at it.

A: And we’re trusting God, and grateful that we are surrounded by such gifted friends, family, and colleagues who help us along in our life, vocations, and continued discernment about our faith and finances.

T: What lessons or tips would you like to share about buying a home and talking about faith and finances?

Gratitude overflowing- New Homeowners Amanda and Jeremy with the previous owner of their home (and the previous owner's family).

Gratitude overflowing- New Homeowners Amanda and Jeremy with the previous owner of their home (and the previous owner’s family).

A: It’s important to take time and be grateful. It can be so easy to get caught up in life, and feelings of scarcity, of not having enough. In buying the house, questions of ‘what if’ about the air conditioner, and water heater potentially needing to be replaced, or about other things that might need to be fixed came up a lot. I could have gotten buried in those types of questions and thoughts. But I’m grateful that some wonderful flooring workers helped us learn more about our new neighborhood. They also helped us take stock, and see that our new home is really a good house. This helped me remember to give thanks.

J: We have come a long way from starting out in our first place, that one bedroom apartment at seminary in Minnesota.  I’m still so grateful for that time, and especially our fun and frugal occasional $5.00 pizza dinners with friends. We’re also very grateful for all of the scholarship support that helped us get through school, and for the faith and gifts of others, who have given to the ELCA Fund for Leaders, people who have given freely because of their faith. We would love to pay it forward, and hope that by having our own home, we can make that happen in some way.

T: Do you have any other thoughts, questions, or insights you would like to share?

J: The biggest question for me seems to be, how do we steward that which we have been entrusted with?

A: We are grateful for the opportunity to have a house, after starting our marriage in a one-bedroom apartment in seminary. We are also grateful for all the support that we have received in the past from so many different people, congregations, and groups. We hope to be able to pay it forward.

J: We are also tithers, and we hope to be able to distribute resources and gifts to more places and needs.

J: Buying a home is more than a purchase for us. We believe we are investing in something. We are committing, at least for the near term, to being rooted in one place. And we continue to work and hope that we can be able to be good stewards of all that we have received.

Pastors Amanda & Jeremy and their dog Lola

Pastors Amanda & Jeremy and their dog Lola

About the Interviewees: Amanda and Jeremy Ullrich are a clergy couple in West Texas, both serving their first congregational calls as ordained pastors. Their family currently includes their wonderful dog, Lola. Together they are tackling the world’s largest puzzle, which includes approximately 33,600 puzzle pieces, because “everything is bigger in Texas,” and “why not go big or go home.” While attending Luther Seminary, they lived next door to Allison and Timothy Siburg, and that was the start of a beautiful friendship.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Talking about Faith and Finances- One Couple’s Experience

During September, the COMPASS blog is digging deeper into the topic of conversations about money by sharing different perspectives, questions, and approaches. As we continue the series today, I am excited to welcome my friends Pastors Amanda and Jeremy Ullrich to the blog. They have very recently purchased their first home which led me to want to hear their story. In hearing it, I have decided that our conversation will make for a two-part series. Today’s post will shed light on how they as a couple have grown since getting married and attending seminary, especially related to talking about money together. The next post will be specifically about their experience of buying a new home.

Amanda and Jeremy with my wife Allison and I

Amanda and Jeremy with my wife Allison and I, after Amanda and Jeremy graduated from seminary.

Timothy (T): First of all, Amanda and Jeremy, thank you so much for being willing to share your story with me, reflecting on how you talk about faith and finances, and how those conversations have led you into very recently purchasing your first house.

Jeremy (J): We are excited to share our story, and hope it helps other young adults and young families in having these conversations.

T: Amanda and Jeremy, how do you have conversations about faith and finances? What challenges have you faced in having these conversations?

J: Good question Timothy. Having these conversations has been a growing process for sure. We each grew up with different understandings and familiarities when it comes to talking about and managing money.

Amanda (A): We had no clue what we were doing when we started.

J: I felt like I had some clue, but I admit, I didn’t know much. I think we were both raised with the idea that, ‘if you don’t have it, don’t spend it.’’ Because of this, we were naturally inclined to not want to spend, especially as we were paying for college and seminary. We were, and really are, inclined to want to save, and live frugally as much as we could. But that looked differently for both of us.

A: When we were first married, it was really difficult to have money conversations.

J: My dad and uncle invested for a long time, including investing in me. For example, growing up, I showed heifers (cows) at the county fair, and after showing they would be sold. All the money that was raised from those sales became scholarship money for me. This was an early opportunity for me to earn some income, and to do some good work by caring for the cows, walking and feeding them.

A: My sisters and I had an allowance growing up. At some point, once I became a teenager, my parents helped set up a checking and savings account for me.

A: After getting married, Jeremy and I didn’t have credit card until two years into marriage and seminary. I think the biggest reason why we didn’t get a credit card until then was because we were afraid of having a credit card. We changed our minds in large part because of financial counseling we received which moved us past our fears to the possibilities. We have learned that when intentional and careful with a credit card, and using it as a tool to build credit, and pay it off right away every month, having one can be a good thing. We actually now have two credit cards now- one used for purchases at a single store as well as for gas.

J: While in seminary we received coaching from a financial coach, and that was a very helpful thing which really helped us grow in our ability to talk about money. In fact, one of the things we did early on which was probably most helpful was that Amanda and I both created a financial autobiography. It was so helpful to hear and dig into our financial stories from growing up. That helped us understand each other so much more.

T: In looking at your finances, how often do you have conversations about them?

A: As a couple, we go over our finances, credit cards, checking accounts, etc., at least once a month. In fact, every transaction that we make I enter into a spread sheet, under a certain tabbed area. This helps us, review, make adjustments, and cut back as needed with our budget.

J: Even though we have figured this out, we still have conflict over finances. I am a bit more of a spender than Amanda, and more quick and willing to spend. In seminary, it was really difficult, because when shopping for something, Amanda and I sometimes had differing opinions about whether a purchase was really a need. These moments of conflict sometimes affected our respect and trust for each other. So it was important for us to talk it out and take some time.

A: For example, Jeremy really wants to get a treadmill. He wants to invest in his health. At first I didn’t see the need, but after talking it out with Jeremy, I have come to see the potential benefits.

J: Through our money conversations we have learned to compromise, but also to learn and hear each other’s opinion. Especially in seminary we tried to always avoid impulse buys, and any unplanned big expense. Now, we are slightly more lenient on that, but we definitely have price limits.

Pastors Jeremy and Amanda Ullrich

Pastors Jeremy and Amanda Ullrich

A: Perhaps the best thing that that has come from our conversations is that our communication between each other has definitely increased over the years.

T: What have you two learned in the process of having these money conversations?

J: We have learned that sometimes we aren’t in the right spot to talk about money. Sometimes it might actually be more painful to talk about than helpful. We have had to realize that these conversations also have to deal with conflict management. As finances are both stewardship and ministry, they also reflect one’s core values. What you spend your money on shows where your heart is. To reflect on this takes time and space. Sometimes we may not have the time or mental capacity to have that reflection together, because of stress from work and life. It’s important then to set a time to come back to the conversation with each other.

A: We have also really learned how to address conflict in a healthy way!  By doing so, we don’t let conflict, or any potential conflict, create more distance between us. We have also been reminded over the years of the gifts of our friends, and have collaborated with them to help strategize and have these conversations.

T: Over the years, and with the purchase of your new home recently, what new questions about faith and finances have emerged for you?

A: We want to tithe to our congregations and give beyond that to different groups, causes, and nonprofits. We are still working to figure out the best model for us to have the most impact with our giving.

J: At the same time, we are facing the reality that a huge part of budget in our congregations is for our salaries. As pastors, we have to wrestle with what does it mean to steward the gifts we have as a congregation.

A: Trying to decide how much money to put down on the house was interesting. And I’ve been wondering especially about how to talk about these issues, and stories, in the pulpit more regularly.

J: I think about the story of the rich man, who is told by Jesus that he needs to sell all his possessions. What does it mean to have finances and still follow Jesus? That’s the point at which it becomes a tension. There seems to often be a fear or focus on finances and financial situations in tension with following God. For instance, who are really worshiping when we think about and use our finances?? God? A checkbook? A bank account? It can be a constant tension. I have come to believe that it is important to live into that tension.

T: What hopes and dreams do you two have?

J: I hope to have a growing family someday, and to be able to care for it well.

A: In addition to that, I hope to be able to pay it forward, as we’re both so grateful for all that we have received and do receive.

Pastors Amanda & Jeremy and their dog Lola

Pastors Amanda & Jeremy and their dog Lola

T: We will pick up the conversation in our next post as we turn to Amanda and Jeremy’s decision to buy their first home.

About the Interviewees: Amanda and Jeremy Ullrich are a clergy couple in West Texas, both serving their first congregational calls as ordained pastors. Their family currently includes their wonderful dog, Lola. Together they are tackling the world’s largest puzzle, which includes approximately 33,600 puzzle pieces, because “everything is bigger in Texas,” and “why not go big or go home.” While attending Luther Seminary, they lived next door to Allison and Timothy Siburg, and that was the start of a beautiful friendship.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Renting vs. Buying

Today we are pleased to welcome Carolyn Lesmeister as a guest blogger as part of COMPASS’ series of reflections about renting, buying and mortgages. If you missed the previous posts in the series by Matthew DeBall and Timothy Siburg, check those out also and join the conversation. 

When my husband and I finished graduate school and moved from the San Francisco Bay area to small-town Indiana, we experienced housing “sticker shock.” For 2/3 of what we’d paid to rent a one-bedroom apartment in Berkeley, we were able to rent a house eight times its size. Our former apartment – in its entirety – could have fit into the formal living room, with room to spare.

It’s possible that the dramatic price drop went to our heads. The two of us rented a four-bedroom house. Our cat basically ended up with his own room. (Yes, our cat.) We didn’t need that much space, but we could easily afford it, so we went a little crazy.

Renting certainly had its perks. It let us stay flexible when we were unsure how stable our jobs were and how long we’d be in one place. It allowed us to learn that it’s hard for two people who work full-time to keep a large house clean. (The cat never did learn how to pick up his toys!) Renting kept us from being tied to a property in a place where the housing market was stagnant.

When you and your landlord don't share maintenance priorities, you sometimes end up learning interesting skills, like how to sweet-talk bats into pillowcases.

When you and your landlord don’t share maintenance priorities, you sometimes end up learning interesting skills, like how to sweet-talk bats into pillowcases.

Most importantly, renting meant that when something went wrong – like when the furnace started making explosion noises and shaking the entire house – all we had to do was call our landlord and let her deal with it. We didn’t have to find a repairman, and we didn’t have to pay the bill.

The downside was that our landlord didn’t always share our perspective on what repairs were necessary. She didn’t seem concerned when we told her that small panes of glass had fallen out of one of the attic windows. As a result, I became an expert at safely and humanely removing bats from our living quarters. We had to learn to live with whatever issues our landlord didn’t fix.

About a year ago, our personal and professional circumstances required us to relocate to downtown Indianapolis. Initially we looked for places to rent but soon discovered that the monthly mortgage payments on a nice house would be less than the going rent (often for not-so-nice places) in the area. As a neighbor quipped, “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood, but the landlords around here seem to think it up-and-came.”

So, we ventured into the fascinating and sometimes terrifying world of buying a house. We considered multiple options when we applied for our mortgage, including a community-based nonprofit that focused on loans for low-income first-time homeowners, a large national bank with some good incentives, and even the mortgage affiliate of our real estate agency. Each had its own perks and its own drawbacks … and its own qualification requirements.

The process had some bumps, but it worked out, and we bought a lovely, two-bedroom, 112-year-old craftsman style house within two miles of the city center. We downsized to a much more manageable house that suits our needs.

One of the "perks" of homeownership is making your house your own. Days off become occassions for spackling, painting, and doing maintenance work.

One of the “perks” of homeownership is making your house your own. Days off become occassions for spackling, painting, and doing maintenance work.

The nice thing about home ownership is that we have complete control over our space. We can paint, update, and landscape to our heart’s content. The downside is that when things go wrong now – like when the kitchen sink detached itself from the counter and tried to fall off – we have to deal with it ourselves. We made half a dozen phone calls before finding someone willing to try and fix that one.

We find ourselves more committed to our community, too. Buying a home – for us – means making a long-term investment in our neighborhood and our city. We care about our local businesses, schools, and community organizations, and we are investing in them even more than we did when we rented in other places.

Since we moved, the words God spoke to Jeremiah keep echoing in my mind, “Work for the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have sent you, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for its welfare will determine your welfare.” (Jer. 29:7)

Renting was a great option for my husband and me when we first started out – and if we’d stayed in California it might have been our only option – but we are enjoying the blessings and challenges of homeownership in this new phase of life.

lesmeister headshotAbout the Author: Carolyn Lesmeister serves alongside her husband as the pastoral team for a unique rural-urban ecumenical ministry cooperative in central Indiana. She’s passionate about loving God and God’s people and is crazy enough to think that faith ought to affect every aspect of a person’s life. She strives to live that way on a daily basis and constantly seeks forgiveness for the ways in which she falls short.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Becoming a Home Owner

It is our privilege to welcome Matt DeBall to the blog as a guest blogger. Today he offers his personal experiences and reflections about “Becoming a Home Owner” as part COMPASS’ current series of posts about ownership, renting and mortgages.

When my wife and I were first married, we didn’t know where we wanted to live. After working part-time jobs through college, we were both in search of full-time employment for the first time, and were looking for work within 25 miles of school. The factors of employment location and the uncertainty of where to settle down led us to start renting a townhouse near school.

For our first year of marriage, renting served us well. Starting out with a rental property rather than buying one helped us to save money, become established in full-time jobs, and pinpoint areas where we wanted to live more permanently. Since we both grew up in nice, medium-sized homes with both parents and one or two siblings, our goal was to buy something similar in preparing to have a family of our own someday. As we looked at homes, we found that fully updated homes of the size we wanted were either near the top or out of our price range, so we narrowed our search to homes that were structurally sound but needed updating.

Our new home with our dog Watson, stealing the show.

Our new home with our dog Watson, stealing the show.

Having both rented a townhouse and now owning our own home, there are two reasons why I prefer owning. First, in our own home, we are able to personalize our living space and make it something we’re excited about. As we rented, we were restricted by the guidelines of the landlord in the ways that we could change the colors, décor, and layout. Now that we’re in a space of our own, we are able to paint, decorate, and update however we’d like. There’s much more freedom in changing a home when the property belongs to you rather than someone else. Second, buying a home feels more like an investment than renting. While we appreciated the lower risk of renting, we recognized that paying a mortgage for a house was only slightly more expensive than our renting cost. Spending money to buy a house and pay a mortgage gave us a return for our investment.

Since going through the process of buying a house, we have a few suggestions about mortgages:

1) Find a mortgage company you can trust – This is not to say that mortgage companies are deceptive, but each one helps first-time home-buyers slightly differently, and one company’s practices may suit you better than another. You will probably be paying money to your mortgage company for at least ten years, and having a good relationship can make the buying process run more smoothly and prevent headaches afterwards.

2) Plan to pay well within your budget – Whether applying for a 15 year or 30 year loan, plan to pay for a house within your means. I’ve heard the guideline that no more than 40% of your income should be paid toward a mortgage payment, but if you are able to pay considerably less you’ll have more money to add improvements to the house and plan for upcoming, unplanned expenses.

3) Keep the extra mortgage insurance in mind – Especially for young couples who are still paying off student loans, putting a down payment on a house for 20% of its value will be rather difficult. However, a lower down payment is possible but typically involves the extra expense of mortgage insurance. While this isn’t much, it is an added expense that will drop off once a certain percentage of the mortgage is paid. Paying this off sooner rather than later will save you a good chunk of change.

4) Make an extra payment each year – We’ve heard the suggestion on several occasions to pay a little extra toward our mortgage each year. This can either include adding extra in each monthly payment or choosing to make one extra payment at the beginning or end of the year. By paying more toward your mortgage each year, this will help knock down the incurred interest on your loan and decrease the timeline for paying off your loan.

Whether choosing to rent or buy a home, there are always risks and difficulties involved. Whenever making important decisions about finances, it has been very helpful for me to remember that everything belongs to the Lord, and that our ultimate trust should be in God not in money. While we may change jobs or move to another place, we are always secure and at home in the love of God.

Matt DeBallAbout the Author: Matt DeBall serves as an assistant to Donor Relations and Communications for the Church of the Brethren. In pursuit of a Master of Divinity from Northern Seminary, Matt is passionate about personal and congregational stewardship and emphasizing how Scripture is relevant for today. He lives with his wife (Chelsea) and their Welsh Corgi (Watson) in northern Illinois.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Millennials, Renting & Home Ownership

Some reflections by Timothy Siburg

Growing up, this might have been a sort of dream house I envisioned. What might your dream house look like?

Growing up, this might have been a sort of dream house I envisioned. What might your dream house look like?

In junior high, I loved math. I couldn’t get enough of Algebra and Geometry. I look back fondly on a project where my classmates and I used geometry, algebra and pre-calculus to design our dream houses. I think everyone’s dream house was some crazy sized mansion with sport courts, beach access, and its own movie theater. Mine was no different. As a seventh grader I imagined my home someday would be that mansion of sorts far bigger than the nice home I grew up in. My, how times have changed.

Fast forward about fifteen years, I’m a married millennial with a couple graduate degrees. Together my wife and I are renting our second apartment since being married. I don’t think this is a completely abnormal experience for people about our age.

Some of my friends are proud home owners. I’m proud of them of being able and willing to make that investment. At the same time, many other friends live in apartments, or share space with their families or friends as roommates. Some other friends who have graduate degrees have gone “back home” to live with their parents in order to save some money and work while looking and wondering what the next chapter of their life will look like.

This wide range of perspectives speaks to a growing norm in our economy. It’s becoming more and more common for people to need to move (and often) for work, and because the average person will work in more than ten different jobs in their lifetime, it’s no longer a held assumption for all millennials and young adults that they will own a home.

A look inside my wife's and my first apartment.

A look inside my wife’s and my first apartment.

Some suggest this is because young adults view renting as better than owning. I am not sure that this is actually the case. I think it has more to do with a desire to be able to be more mobile, or a sense that one’s life situation is far from concrete in their current setting.

Someday my wife and I would like to own a home. Maybe that day will be coming sooner rather than later? It’s not likely to come though until our job situations are a bit more stable. Together as a couple we have discerned that if we can make it work with our budget and savings, we are okay renting for now. Long term it would be nice to have a sort of small or medium sized home base. But we both love to travel- for work and pleasure, so we don’t think we’ll need the larger sort of house I grew up in.

It’s a little sad to think that we can’t envision living in as nice a home as the one we grew up in. But at the same time, the idea from prior generations that the size of your home represents your status in life and wealth doesn’t really appeal to us. The size of our home doesn’t really have a high value for us. It’s more important to be able to give, live and serve out of which God has entrusted us. My sense is that this may be true for many others of our generation.

What do you think? What are your thoughts and experiences regarding renting and owning?

Image CreditDream Home.

About the author: Timothy Siburg currently serves as a Communications Associate for Ecumenical Stewardship Center and the COMPASS Initiative. He is happily married to his wife Allison, holds a couple MA degrees, and currently calls Minnesota home. You can read more about him and some of the other questions he wrestles with at his own blog.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.