How to Give More During Lent (and Beyond) – Part 2

By Matt DeBall

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We began this month with an introduction post by Marcia Shelter that invited us to 
consider how we can “give more” during Lent—taking a step beyond the traditional trend of “giving something up” for Lent. Two weeks ago, I invited you to do a self-inventory of your time, possessions, and budget to consider what you can put aside or change for Lent that could allow for the capacity to give more. Last week, Timothy Siburg shared a great reflection about how he has taken on something new for Lent this year. This week we will explore how to take practical steps to move forward and give more during Lent.

Taking a path of simplicity and generosity, especially in our world today, is not always an easy task. With many demands (some very important, some not so much) on our time, energy, and resources, it’s easy to get caught up in the ebb and flow of a busy life and miss the opportunity to live in a way that best honors God and shows love to those around us. The season of Lent invites us to intentionally consider all that is happening in our lives and to put some things aside to more fully focus on the work of Jesus through his death and resurrection as well as the work that God continues to do in us and in the world.

A helpful first step toward living a more generous life is considering how you spend or share your time, energy, possessions, and money. For help to do this, feel free to check out the first part of this post. After doing a careful assessment of these aspects of our lives, we can then move forward and make changes to be more generous. Here are a few thoughts to help you consider how to give more:

1) Give more time – Is there a member of your family, faith community, or neighborhood who is in a rough season? Is there a way that you could offer help or simply a listening ear to show God’s love to them? Is there a local charity or community group that does great work and whom could benefit from your service? Is there an initiative at box-18749_1280your church that you are passionate about but have not yet given a try? All of these are questions that can help you share more of your time.

2) Give more money – Have you noticed any purchases like drive-thru coffee, eating out that you could replace with cheaper alternatives for Lent (or longer)? Do you have a phone plan or TV package that is more complex (and expensive) than you need? These cost savings may not amount to significant savings, but every bit we can decrease in our regular expenses allows us the flexibility and peace of mind to be more generous. In cutting down non-essential costs, what ministry of your church or initiative in your community could benefit from your support?

3) Give away or share more possessions – Now is the perfect time for spring cleaning.
Are there any items which you rarely or never use (clothes, tools, non-perishable foods, books, or other lightly worn objects) which you could give to someone in need or share with a local charity? You may also want to consider selling nicer clothes to a second-hand store and donating the money you receive to an organization in your community. Does gratitude-1201945_1280someone
in your neighborhood attend the same church or community events as you? And could carpooling be
a valuable option for both of you? Considering these
ideas may help you become a better steward of what
God has given you.

4) BONUS – Give more of yourself – After minimizing non-essential drains on our time, energy, and money, we not only have more of these items to give, but in general, we have more of ourselves to give. When our schedules
are less full with non-essential fillers, our living spaces
are less cluttered, and our minds are less busy, we can be more fully present in our times of rest (whether alone or with family) as well as in moments of sharing and serving others.

Though making changes can be difficult, it’s remarkable how small adjustments can make a big difference. As you consider how God may be leading you to be more generous, we hope you will feel renewed in this Lenten season and beyond.

About the Author

m-deball-9-2016Matt DeBall is the COMPASS Communications Coordinator for the Ecumenical Stewardship Center. He also serves as Coordinator of Donor Communications for the Church of the Brethren. He has an MDiv from Northern Seminary of Lombard, Illinois and a BA in Communication Arts from Judson University of Elgin, Illinois. He loves running, reading, and napping. He and Chelsea live in Northern Illinois with their Welsh Corgi, Watson, and attend the First Baptist Church of Aurora.

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you’ve read? Visit the COMPASS web page, follow us on Twitter, and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Image credits: pixabay.com

Four Simple Financial New Year’s Resolutions: Share, Save, Spend, and Plan

Four Simple Financial New Year’s Resolutions: Share, Save, Spend, and Plan

During January the COMPASS blog is sharing space for financial new year’s resolutions. The series continues as Marcia Shetler, CEO of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center shares some thoughts about sharing, saving, spending, and planning.

happy new yearWith a grateful nod to my friend Nathan Dungan, I’d like to suggest four simple financial new year’s resolutions. Nathan is founder and president of Share Save Spend, and his website is full of great resources related to finances.

  1. Share!

Data about young adult giving in Canada and the US provides mixed reviews. The Globe and Mail reported last summer that less young Canadians are giving financially. In the US, though, CNBC reported that 84% of Millennials made a charitable donation in 2014, and 70% spent at least an hour volunteering.  But because their giving is strongly influenced by their peers, social media momentum, and current issues, it can tend to be sporadic.

While some Christians use the tithe (10 percent of income) as a giving measurement, it can also be a goal to aim for over a period of time. Do you know what percentage of your income you gave as charitable gifts in 2015? If you’d like to give more, set a “step goal” for yourself: an increase of a percentage or two. Now translate that into actual dollars and decide how you would like to give it. You can even include a category for unexpected or new opportunities you might encounter this year.

  1. Save!

It can be hard to save when you are faced with student debt and new expenses related to living on your own, but getting into the savings habit will reap benefits in both the short run and long-term. Sometimes adding to your savings is as easy as increasing your knowledge. For example, does your employer offer matching contributions to your retirement fund, and are you taking advantage of that opportunity? According to CNW, more than one third of Canadian Millennials can’t answer that question.

Even if you have a tight budget, you can develop a saving mindset. Pick a short-term goal. Save your loose change. Save by spending less, like on apps, eating out (including work lunches), and entertainment that costs money. Open a savings account and schedule automatic transfers from your checking account, perhaps synching it with your payday. Money you never “see” can be easier to save.

  1. Spend!

For most people, money is an integral and unavoidable part of life. So if we are going to spend, it’s important to do so wisely. Just this month, right after the traditional Christmas gift-buying binge, The Washington Post reported that one of the newest spending trends is choosing experiences over tangibles. “People are saying, I’ve got enough stuff. I want to pamper myself a bit and do something that makes me feel good,’” the article quotes Steven Kirn, executive director of the University of Florida’s retail education and research center, as saying. This kind of attitude toward spending can spiral out of control quickly.

In the COMPASS blog, we’ve encouraged looking for ways to live a fulfilled life without overspending. Here are a few previous posts that you might want to read for more ideas:

  1. Plan!

time to plan“If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” is a familiar phrase. Whether you want to share more, save more, or spend more wisely in 2016, developing a plan to do so is essential. If you’re not sure how much money you have or where it goes, gaining that understanding is a necessary first step. For just one month, or even just one pay period, keep a detailed record of where all your money went. How much did you share? How much did you save? How much did you spend? How can you adjust so that you are sharing, saving, and spending to reflect the life that God is calling you to live?

This blog is a component of the Ecumenical Stewardship Center’s COMPASS initiative to engage young adults in conversations about faith and finances. Like what you see and want to know/do more? Visit the COMPASS web page and join the COMPASS community on Facebook.

Image Credits: Happy New Year and Time to Plan